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RevanKnight

The Clone Wars Season 7

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We shall see.The fact that they haven't sacked Kathleen Kennedy yet speaks volumes.In any case, I'm not keeping my hopes up for this one. It'd be nice if we get some decent, new CW episodes, but it would also be akin to a miracle.Definitely not supporting Disney by subscribing to their new streaming service. There are other ways... (Once a rebel, always a rebel.)

You mean they fired their main SJW? Oh thank the Force!

Subscribing to a service? Phah! Piracy for the win! (and yes, I know it's an upopular opinion)

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You mean they fired their main SJW? Oh thank the Force!

They haven't. That's the problem. She is still assigned to handling the latest in the Star Wars line, and even still playing a prominent role in the media in their latest announcements: https://www.starwars.com/news/jon-favreau-to-executive-produce-write-live-action-star-wars-series

 

They still think she's the shiz -- despite the declining sales.

 

This crap will go on for a long time, until they start to run out of money. In the meantime, they'll make sure to damage as much of the Star Wars brand and content as they can (and that includes The Clone Wars as well).

 

I think "saved" is very much the wrong word to use in the title of this thread -- an overhyped marketing catchphrase that they are promoting intentionally.

 

#CloneWarsToBeSlain lies closer to their actual intentions, and to the effect this will ultimately have on the series' popularity.

 

That's the grim future from this announcement that I foresee. But please, prove me wrong, Disney!

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They haven't. That's the problem. She is still assigned to handling the latest in the Star Wars line, and even still playing a prominent role in the media in their latest announcements: https://www.starwars.com/news/jon-favreau-to-executive-produce-write-live-action-star-wars-series

 

They still think she's the shiz -- despite the declining sales.

 

This crap will go on for a long time, until they start to run out of money. In the meantime, they'll make sure to damage as much of the Star Wars brand and content as they can (and that includes The Clone Wars as well).

 

I think "saved" is very much the wrong word to use in the title of this thread -- an overhyped marketing catchphrase that they are promoting intentionally.

 

#CloneWarsToBeSlain lies closer to their actual intentions, and to the effect this will ultimately have on the series' popularity.

 

That's the grim future from this announcement that I foresee. But please, prove me wrong, Disney!

 

TBCR.gif

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They haven't. That's the problem. She is still assigned to handling the latest in the Star Wars line, and even still playing a prominent role in the media in their latest announcements: https://www.starwars.com/news/jon-favreau-to-executive-produce-write-live-action-star-wars-seriesThey still think she's the shiz -- despite the declining sales.This crap will go on for a long time, until they start to run out of money. In the meantime, they'll make sure to damage as much of the Star Wars brand and content as they can (and that includes The Clone Wars as well).I think "saved" is very much the wrong word to use in the title of this thread -- an overhyped marketing catchphrase that they are promoting intentionally.#CloneWarsToBeSlain lies closer to their actual intentions, and to the effect this will ultimately have on the series' popularity.That's the grim future from this announcement that I foresee. But please, prove me wrong, Disney!

Oh right, you said "haven't sacked". Gosh darn it, i'm so inattentive! >.<

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I hope you two realize that KK is one of main reasons for this show returning, right?

Personally, I'm looking forward to this, despite having my doubts with the show's pacing. But hey, it's better for the show to hit its final episode than to be cancelled and never get finished.

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Personally, I'm looking forward to this, despite having my doubts with the show's pacing. But hey, it's better for the show to hit its final episode than to be cancelled and never get finished.

What do you mean? Siege of mandalore was already planned as a 4 episode arc and the other 8 we've most likely seen before and they were paced fine

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Personally, I'm looking forward to this, despite having my doubts with the show's pacing. But hey, it's better for the show to hit its final episode than to be cancelled and never get finished.

What do you mean? Siege of mandalore was already planned as a 4 episode arc and the other 8 we've most likely seen before and they were paced fine

What is this pacing you guys are talking about? Did I miss something again? :huh:

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How's that?

KK is the president of Lucasfilm, she's the person responsible for vetoing and permititing the Star Wars media.

 

What do you mean? Siege of mandalore was already planned as a 4 episode arc and the other 8 we've most likely seen before and they were paced fine

I simply don't want the show to be rushed to tell every arc possible they had left. @McGoose explained it very well by using Samurai Jack in comparison.
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People have way too high hopes for this. I'm expecting the exact same situation with what we got with the Samurai Jack return, in which we got a bunch of sorta good episodes unfortunately with a really rushed and poorly fleshed out story due to the very limited amount of episodes and length per episode. Expect a rushed ending, expect to see basically a bunch of old episode ideas mixed together into single episodes with insufficient story progression due to the limited time per episode. Also don't expect the level of maturity to be on level with what the Clone Wars was like previously due to Disney carefully choosing whats "appropriate". Disney is doing this to make people stop talking about the Clone Wars once they've given the fans some scraps of what they actually want so they can move on to their other garbage, basically a way to convince the fans that they haven't been completely abandoned. "See, see, we're giving you Clone Wars, you like us now right?!" And then they completely abandon it again. This season is going to be fun at first and then looked at less admiringly in the future, I damn near guarantee it. There were a good 60-some episodes planned prior to the cancellation. You're only getting 12 episodes, basically half the length of a regular season and this will be the only season you're getting. Disney isn't giving this to you to please the fans, they're doing this to distract you and make you all shut up.

Or they can actually try to milk it for all its worth, and make those extra 12-15 episodes, of course, depending on how the first 12 are received by the audience.

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I've done a little digging behind the scenes into Disney's current (and historic) business practices and marketing strategies. The Star Wars line has exhibited some of their worst moves -- both ethically and in terms of sustainability. (And just sheer arrogance and stupidity.)

 

8QHVLaTS9fTFFXQMxfhSJk-480-80.jpg

 

For the intrigued, here's a short summary, made easy for you:

 

The fundamental internal business tagline for KK's management of Star Wars is: "Out with the old, in with the new -- our new." The idea is to make that which was popular of Star Wars unpopular, and to introduce new content in its place for a "new generation" of fans.

 

This is why this revival of The Clone Wars is going to flop -- no question about it. It's carefully planned. Milk it, and put an end to it -- those are the orders.

 

What this radical business strategy (the likes of which only a conglomerate like Disney could afford) doesn't take into account is the artistic merit that made Star Wars what it is today -- which is something that The Clone Wars team (with the assistance of George and Katie Lucas) actually carefully invested in over time, for its fans, and what made the show a fan favourite. You ignore that, you focus on the business aspects of the franchise only, and you lose the quality of the brand, slowly killing it. Which is what's actually happening throughout the franchise and all its creative content if you look around, and stop to think.

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I've done a little digging behind the scenes into Disney's current (and historic) business practices and marketing strategies. The Star Wars line has exhibited some of their worst moves -- both ethically and in terms of sustainability. (And just sheer arrogance and stupidity.)

 

8QHVLaTS9fTFFXQMxfhSJk-480-80.jpg

 

For the intrigued, here's a short summary, made easy for you:

 

The fundamental internal business tagline for KK's management of Star Wars is: "Out with the old, in with the new -- our new." The idea is to make that which was popular of Star Wars unpopular, and to introduce new content in its place for a "new generation" of fans.

 

This is why this revival of The Clone Wars is going to flop -- no question about it. It's carefully planned. Milk it, and put an end to it -- those are the orders.

 

What this radical business strategy (the likes of which only a conglomerate like Disney could afford) doesn't take into account is the artistic merit that made Star Wars what it is today -- which is something that The Clone Wars team (with the assistance of George and Katie Lucas) actually carefully invested in over time, for its fans, and what made the show a fan favourite. You ignore that, you focus on the business aspects of the franchise only, and you lose the quality of the brand, slowly killing it. Which is what's actually happening throughout the franchise and all its creative content if you look around, and stop to think.

 

Certainly sounds radical. Given the level of research and digging that you have done, could you provide some sources?

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I simply don't want the show to be rushed to tell every arc possible they had left. @McGoose explained it very well by using Samurai Jack in comparison.

I'd be shocked if they tried to do that, also samurai jack and this show are structured very differently 

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I've done a little digging behind the scenes into Disney's current (and historic) business practices and marketing strategies. The Star Wars line has exhibited some of their worst moves -- both ethically and in terms of sustainability. (And just sheer arrogance and stupidity.)

 

8QHVLaTS9fTFFXQMxfhSJk-480-80.jpg

 

For the intrigued, here's a short summary, made easy for you:

 

The fundamental internal business tagline for KK's management of Star Wars is: "Out with the old, in with the new -- our new." The idea is to make that which was popular of Star Wars unpopular, and to introduce new content in its place for a "new generation" of fans.

 

This is why this revival of The Clone Wars is going to flop -- no question about it. It's carefully planned. Milk it, and put an end to it -- those are the orders.

 

What this radical business strategy (the likes of which only a conglomerate like Disney could afford) doesn't take into account is the artistic merit that made Star Wars what it is today -- which is something that The Clone Wars team (with the assistance of George and Katie Lucas) actually carefully invested in over time, for its fans, and what made the show a fan favourite. You ignore that, you focus on the business aspects of the franchise only, and you lose the quality of the brand, slowly killing it. Which is what's actually happening throughout the franchise and all its creative content if you look around, and stop to think.

Then why are they bringing back prequel stuff lately instead of pushing the sequel era?

 

Also how is clone wars going to flop? Do you mean the quality will be bad or what? It's still filoni and he has been consistently good 

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Then why are they bringing back prequel stuff lately instead of pushing the sequel era?

Retcons and backstories of stuff they recognize is canon (the six movies, TCW, and a few more) are one thing, throwing out the stuff that they don't recognize as canon (KOTOR, post-RotJ events, etc.) is another.

Sure, they're bringing back some of the old stuff (Malachor, Thrawn, etc.), but it's mostly fan-service, so the old fans don't leave. But they're changing it so much, that it's no longer what the old fans loved (or is only barely that). And they're using this changed content to make way for their new canon. After all, making new canon requires some backstory, so the transition feels more natural.

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Retcons and backstories of stuff they recognize is canon (the six movies, TCW, and a few more) are one thing, throwing out the stuff that they don't recognize as canon (KOTOR, post-RotJ events, etc.) is another.

Sure, they're bringing back some of the old stuff (Malachor, Thrawn, etc.), but it's mostly fan-service, so the old fans don't leave. But they're changing it so much, that it's no longer what the old fans loved (or is only barely that). And they're using this changed content to make way for their new canon. After all, making new canon requires some backstory, so the transition feels more natural.

Let the past die. Kill it if you have to

 

Actually tho it's a necessary evil to make legends, they couldn't just make the new movies remakes of the books

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Let the past die. Kill it if you have to

 

Actually tho it's a necessary evil to make legends, they couldn't just make the new movies remakes of the books

I wasn's saying that it was necessary or not, just explaining

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Certainly sounds radical. Given the level of research and digging that you have done, could you provide some sources?

This is a research spanning many years, and hundreds of sources. Which part are you interested in in particular?

 

Here are a few of the more credible, online articles I've collected (relating to recent events) that provide a general insight into Disney's on-going business strategy as it relates to the Star Wars brand, and its future results -- an appetiser, if you will:

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-06-25/disney-s-star-wars-headaches-include-outcry-from-its-own-fans

 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/star-wars-producer-kathleen-kennedy-next-10-years-rey-poe-finn-150456794.html (Watch the Kathleen Kennedy video interview mid-way through the webisode.)

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/scottmendelson/2018/06/12/box-office-solo-star-wars-bomb-flop-disney-lucasfilm-incredibles2-jurassic-world/

 

And an honorary mention (great commentary):

 

https://www.thewrap.com/solo-is-failing-because-disney-had-no-vision-for-the-star-wars-franchise-commentary/

 

Also how is clone wars going to flop? Do you mean the quality will be bad or what? It's still filoni and he has been consistently good

I mean that the ending will be changed (Rebels-like), forced, rushed, and unsatisfying in comparison to the rest of the series. Since Filoni is directing this as well -- mind you, much of his team has changed and been disbanded after the Disney acquisition -- this will look like The Clone Wars has failed to deliver in its final chapters, effectively putting fans off the series and the prequel era. Hence the "flop".

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This is a research spanning many years, and hundreds of sources. Which part are you interested in in particular?

 

Here are a few of the more credible, online articles I've collected (relating to recent events) that provide a general insight into Disney's on-going business strategy as it relates to the Star Wars brand, and its future results -- an appetiser, if you will:

 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-06-25/disney-s-star-wars-headaches-include-outcry-from-its-own-fans

 

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/star-wars-producer-kathleen-kennedy-next-10-years-rey-poe-finn-150456794.html (Watch the Kathleen Kennedy video interview mid-way through the webisode.)

 

https://www.forbes.com/sites/scottmendelson/2018/06/12/box-office-solo-star-wars-bomb-flop-disney-lucasfilm-incredibles2-jurassic-world/

 

And an honorary mention (great commentary):

 

https://www.thewrap.com/solo-is-failing-because-disney-had-no-vision-for-the-star-wars-franchise-commentary/

 

 

I mean that the ending will be changed (Rebels-like), forced, rushed, and unsatisfying in comparison to the rest of the series. Since Filoni is directing this as well -- mind you, much of his team has changed and been disbanded after the Disney acquisition -- this will look like The Clone Wars has failed to deliver in its final chapters, effectively putting fans off the series and the prequel era. Hence the "flop".

 

I read through/watched those sources (I have seen the KK interview before), but they just seem to reiterate what we already know about Solo and what went wrong there. I was more interested in how you are so certain that the Clone Wars has been brought back as a deliberate effort by Lucasfilm to "make that which was popular of Star Wars unpopular". I can not see any evidence for that, and bringing back the show in the first place would seem to fly directly against that idea.

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I read through/watched those sources (I have seen the KK interview before), but they just seem to reiterate what we already know about Solo and what went wrong there. I was more interested in how you are so certain that the Clone Wars has been brought back as a deliberate effort by Lucasfilm to "make that which was popular of Star Wars unpopular". I can not see any evidence for that, and bringing back the show in the first place would seem to fly directly against that idea.

Fans have been persistently asking them about if and when The Clone Wars will be brought back for years, with too many letters and petitions: https://www.change.org/p/lucasfilm-bring-star-wars-the-clone-wars-season-7-8

 

So, no, it doesn't go against that agenda to bring it back subpar, then let it sink. As long as the old show lives on as a wonderful thing in fans' memories, this undermines Lucasfilm's latest efforts -- which I'll expand on below.

 

You can see from Kathleen's responses in that video, as well as Disney's ongoing business plan for Star Wars, even in the links I've provided, that they are constantly aiming to push forward, far past the world that George Lucas has created (which, it seems, they feel to be a dead-end for some reason), and into their own, original Star Wars universe. You don't need to look too far, this is reflected in the themes and content of their movies as well. Old characters and themes die, or are presented unceremoniously, even parodied, while new ones are given the spotlight. There was strong reasoning in Disney's decision to can The Clone Wars in the first place, and to create Rebels in its place. To think that experienced Hollywood executives have suddenly changed their mind halway through a decades-long business plan is (very) naive thinking, especially since Kathleen is still openly at the head of Lucasfilm.

 

Although a very risky strategy, Disney has much to gain from killing off what made Star Wars once popular, starting with the cast of the original movies, as they have, first with the official sequel trilogy films, and now with the spinoff films. From what I can sensibly tell, based on my long research, they are hoping to wipe the slate clean, to lower fan expectations, and to create their own version of Star Wars, independent of, or barely linked to, the world Lucas established. The best way to do that is to build hype and make sales while producing below expected level quality content for a long period of time -- which is something that Disney can actually afford to do. This is why they are not horrified by Solo's lower than expected box-office results, and why Kathleen Kennedy is still leading full-charge at the forefront.

 

Star Wars, to Disney, is a long-term investment. They bought it not for the world Lucas has created, but for value of the IP itself. This is evident in Lucas' backlash at Disney shortly after the sale took place and they excluded his vision from the future of Star Wars.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jWtbJxzGpQ

 

A decade-long production of lower-quality content that mixes the old with the new ensures that the memories of excellence are wiped, and there is room for "dazzling" with a new Star Wars, a kind that will fit the Marvel-like marketing and production scheme better, with classic superheroes and villains, and little actually deep or meaningful character and story development. This is something that their business side requires to fit things into a well-established mold and to maximally profit on the brand -- I don't think I need to cite sources for that, it's evident in any business review of the company's movie side of business.

 

If you take all this into account, it becomes undoubtedly evident that Disney is not faltering, but making well-calculated choices. No company that invests millions into their products does so without strategy and a well-calculated return, even if that means some financial sacrifice -- especially not a corporation of Disney's size that has been in the movie business for generations. Hence, the decisions to kill off main characters, to shove them into the background, to produce low quality content featuring them, are consciously made. After all, what is stopping Disney from featuring these characters as the heroes they are/were? With the resources at their disposal, a carefully calculated business decision.

 

You will not find any direct mention of this in any source, understandably, as what goes on in a company stays in a company, but the sheer evidence is overwhelming. Disney has been particularly careful not to give away anything in interviews with its directors, to keep everything related to Star Wars hush-hush (arguably in an overly careful way that their Marvel cinematic universe has not been treated).

 

I expect the prequel era may be brought back -- though unlikely, due to its marketing drawbacks (historical bad reception and fan backlash) -- but if it is, it will be purposefully different, with a lot of rewrites, essentially creating a new world.

 

All of this wouldn't be so bad if Disney actually knew what to do with Star Wars creatively, but as it is, their creative directors and storywriters so far have been at a complete loss. This is because Kathleen Kennedy and the current Lucasfilm management are no creative visionaries, but Hollywood businessmen, and there is no-one to unite the picture the way George Lucas had done in the past. A lot of ideas are thrown about, a lot experimentation happening, but no contrete experience in how to tackle the Star Wars universe/fanbase and establish new themes that will last decades.

 

Creatively, this is Disney's biggest problem, and something that they have created themselves by stepping away from the world Lucas has established. Their fears are particularly evident in the story treatment of the new sequel trilogy, and subsequent films like Solo, where their movie directors are kept under shackles by the sheer burden of not knowing what changes they are allowed to make, and what new stories and themes they are allowed to write into the Star Wars universe, everything kept to old templates. Disney, as an investor, is carefully experimenting because it is scared in not knowing what will work with the long-time fans, while trying to build an entirely different universe than that of George's -- all the while trying to continue making money on the franchise.

 

They are experimenting not only with the creative content, but also with marketing it and its impact on the fandom/audience, and in this case that means how to play with and alter long-time expectations.

 

So don't go rushing into thinking that the old Clone Wars has been "saved" or "revived" just yet... (Or do so with great risk...)

 

From Disney's perspective, this "revival" is happening for two reasons:

 

1. To satisfy director Dave Filoni's creative wish and to sign him on to future (Disney universe Star Wars) TV series on Disney's new direct-to-consumer service.

 

2. To end The Clone Wars (and the Lucas prequel era legacy) -- for good -- and make remaining fans let it go, let it fade away -- hence the huge hype for an unlikely delivery in the end product.

 

In simpler words, Disney's current creative direction for Star Wars content (including TCW), illustrated:

 

4gxuPFm.jpg

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lin3V-dhhNU

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[snip]

 

Now, I'm not exactly a Disney fanboy (there's good and bad sides to the new canon) and I don't doubt you strongly believe what you have posted, however despite the long and detailed posts what you are proposing is entirely speculative with little actual objective evidence - that is to say, evidence for which your hypothesis is the sole conclusion. I am afraid what you're suggesting is conjecture so far, and most (if not all) points have other possible answers that are just as if not more likely.

 

The idea that Disney would not change a "decades-long business plan" does not reflect how large corporations do business. Inflexibility is not how you get to be the biggest kid in the playground. We have a wealth of evidence that changing the plan is precisely what Disney is willing to do - the Rogue One reshoots and the replacement of the original Solo directors with Ron Howard are two well-documented examples of the company willing to make radical (and expensive) changes in the name of delivering a good final product.

 

The original reason for cancelling Clone Wars is also well-documented and largely comes down to two issues - budget (it was costing several million $ an episode) and tone (it was too mature for its would-be home on one of the Disney channels) with the expense being the primary factor of the two. As the fresh owner of the Star Wars IP, it would have been a risky play to invest such big $ in the show. Given what you have said you know of Disney's intentions, I'm sure you will agree that their first priority would be to ensure their new acquisition turns a profit and the safest way for them to do that was to invest in a) The upcoming Force Awakens and b) A TV show they could own and broadcast outright without sharing it with another network (i.e. Rebels).

 

So why bring the show back now? 

 

You propose it is two-fold. One, to keep Dave Filoni on-side. Again, this is not how big companies work. Filoni is a huge part of Star Wars animation's success over the last ten years (TCW and Rebels alike) but let's be realistic. If Disney is all about the bottom-line and creating their own universe at the expense of the old, they are not going to throw several million $ at a project set during an era they are apparently trying to eradicate just to keep one man happy. Especially when they have a separate show coming up (Resistance) set entirely in their new world, with their new characters, etc that requires resources, promotion and creative leadership.

 

Secondly, you suggest it is to wrap up the prequel/Lucas era for good. Clone Wars was already dead, despite the hashtags and petitions I would posit a majority of fans did not expect the show to ever actually return (for the same reasons as before - largely expense). There is literally no reason that obliged Disney to invest the necessary time, people and resources in concluding the series when so many alternatives were on offer. Novels (Dark Disciple) and comics (Son of Dathomir) are both tried-and-tested methods of telling the same story if they wanted to do so out of a sense of creative obligation, and could have been done at a fraction of the cost.

 

So what's different now? Why change the "plan"?

 

I keep using that phrase 'how big companies work' and it's key to my alternative suggestion. Big companies - and for the giants like Disney this is increased tenfold - maintain their position through a combination of safe bets, market research and a huge archive of customer data constantly being gathered and analysed. Now don't get me wrong, I love that Clone Wars is coming back but I do not believe it is being done as a 'thank you' to the fans, or because Filoni won Disney execs round with a passionate speech or anything else. It, as ever, comes down to money.

 

Look at the format the show is coming back in - it is there to help launch the new Disney streaming service (it doesn't have a name yet - let's just call it Disneyflix). Disney/Lucasfilm has access to a ton of metric data that the public never sees, and this includes things like viewership and sales figures. Season Six did very well on Netflix (I remember it dominating the animation section when it first arrived) and given the multiple re-releases and boxsets it is fair to assume that sales for DVD/Blu-Ray have also been strong. If Disney is bringing it back now, it is because its own research and data since 2012 suggests it has moved from "risky" to "safe" as a revenue generator.

 

It is also a product with huge marketability potential - and that is key. The show is coming back to promote the launch of Disneyflix, so having something that will hype people up, get them talking about the upcoming streaming service, etc is the overall goal and judging by the reception so far this is succeeding. When Disneyflix launches it will be done with a HUGE investment in marketing as they are trying to push into a sector dominated by Netflix, Amazon Prime, etc. Dropping a few million $ into a show that will be one of the exclusive 'draws' of the new launch is a more profitable investment than doing so back in 2012 to allow Cartoon Network to keep broadcasting a show in its seventh season.

 

This is becoming an essay of my own now so I am going to wrap up, but I hope the above shows an entirely different explanation behind Disney's decisions - and ones that I find to be more practical and realistic than the idea that is part of a Machiavellian-style scheme to turn the fans against the prequel/Lucas era.

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This is becoming an essay of my own now so I am going to wrap up, but I hope the above shows an entirely different explanation behind Disney's decisions - and ones that I find to be more practical and realistic than the idea that is part of a Machiavellian-style scheme to turn the fans against the prequel/Lucas era.

It is not entirely different. In fact, it states many of the same points I have made (I have never denied that profits are the driving factor in the decision-making process), except for putting more faith into Disney's flexibility as a company. Let's be honest, though, Hollywood is anything but creatively flexible. It relies on templates time and time again. And what the Disney management is trying hardest to do, now -- so far completely unsuccessfully -- is to fit Star Wars, an age-old template into a new-age one -- essentially, to turn an epic into a comic book.

 

The notion that corporations are trying to control their consumers is nothing new, and Disney has been a company to do that since its original creation. If you want, I can give you conrete examples where the company has sought to steal, cheat, manipulate, and politically and legally silence to further their own agenda, save their profits, and change public perception.

 

The Disney Vault is also a simple marketing example of psychological consumer demand control.

 

Furthermore, I can give you evidence of "Machiavellian-style" audience manipulation is Disney's classic movie range as well, by comparing the movies to their source material -- but that will pretty much change your perception of Disney forever, and potentially ruin a part of your childhood (which I feel is too much responsibility for me to bear). You are free to do your own research if you like.

 

Also, while my research reaches an independent conclusion based on well gathered data as evidence, you can't deny that at least in part it makes good sense. To shun it as "speculation" does it injustice. Everyone is free to draw up their own conclusions from it, but, yes, I firmly believe that my insight and predictions are very close to what is actually happening within the company, and what is likely to happen going forward.

 

We have a wealth of evidence that changing the plan is precisely what Disney is willing to do - the Rogue One reshoots and the replacement of the original Solo directors with Ron Howard are two well-documented examples of the company willing to make radical (and expensive) changes in the name of delivering a good final product.

Note that this is factually wrong. The firing of the original Solo directos, Chris Miller and Phil Lord, was prompted due to the directors doing what they do best: artistically improvising. In other words, their style of work did not fit Disney's rigid expectations and template. Disney was not being flexible, here, at all, and the action was not done to improve on the final product, but rather to make it more predictable: https://www.businessinsider.com.au/han-solo-directors-fired-reason-2017-6

 

If Disney is all about the bottom-line and creating their own universe at the expense of the old, they are not going to throw several million $ at a project set during an era they are apparently trying to eradicate just to keep one man happy. Especially when they have a separate show coming up (Resistance) set entirely in their new world, with their new characters, etc that requires resources, promotion and creative leadership.

They will if this means a) strenghtening relationships with a strong asset for their new steaming service (Filoni as a TV show director) going forward b) there are profitable financial returns from releasing the final season of the series c) they can throw in promotional material for Rebels and the next series into this wrap-up.

 

The Clone Wars was the last Star Wars content Lucas has successfully produced to his own vision, and Disney's entire creative battle plan (from the start and) going forward involves abandoning anything to do with Lucas' original themes and concepts, as is evident from the new content they've produced, and turning Star Wars into something they can produce, market, and sell more easily (something that involves less risk and less work). Make no mistake, the prequel era, as we know it, will end.

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Oh, also, I've noticed a peculiar chance pattern: every time Disney "revives" a particular Star Wars content, it's the beginning of its end.

 

The Force Awakens and the sequel trilogy was to "revive" the OT era and characters -- instead it killed it/them off, quite literally, bringing things to a(n unsatisfactory) close.

 

Rogue One was to revive the flame for A New Hope and the OT -- instead it messed with its opening, killing some of its magic, and providing nothing lasting to make new stories from.

 

Solo was to bring back Han Solo's character and story into the spotlight -- instead it made him look insignificant and sink.

 

Now The Clone Wars...

 

Is really no-one else getting a bad feeling about this? :huh:

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Oh, also, I've noticed a peculiar chance pattern: every time Disney "revives" a particular Star Wars content, it's the beginning of its end.The Force Awakens and the sequel trilogy was to "revive" the OT era and characters -- instead it killed it/them off, quite literally, bringing things to a(n unsatisfactory) close.Rogue One was to revive the flame for A New Hope and the OT -- instead it messed with its opening, killing some of its magic, and providing nothing lasting to make new stories from.Solo was to bring back Han Solo's character and story into the spotlight -- instead it made him look insignificant and sink.Now The Clone Wars...Is really no-one else getting a bad feeling about this? :huh:

I actually liked Rogue One. It felt close to both the OT and the PT, and also added new content, and was just dark, not in the traditional SW-mysticism sense, but from a human perspective. True, it looked a bit too futuristic even for the Prequels (if not actually out of place), but that's what you get when your film franchise spans decades and is filmed in retrospect (just look at James Bond, or Scooby-Doo, or the Simpsons - they should all be old or dead by now, but no, they're forever the same age, despite recognizing the passage of time in the world). And did they really mess up by removing the text crawl? I think not. As iconic as it is, personally, after seeing it in every SW movie, cartoon, game, comic, book, etc., I'm rather sick of it. As to the lack of any follow-up-able content, I don't worry about that - the whole film was one big retcon.

The Sequels and Solo were bad, I agree. And it wasn't just those questionable decisions (killing Luke), the writing and character development were just pathetic, and - this is just my opinion - Finn's the only character in the Sequels who feels like a real person, Kylo Ren being second (as whinny as he is). Everyone else is either dead (as a character - Luke, Leia, Chewie), generic (Han, Poe, Maz, Hux), or both (Rey). The Solo movie is like that too, but the real problem there was the pacing and the perspective, because it's an origin story and Han's supposed to be a wannabe-baddass-but-really-a-twat, but yeah, you'd think they'd make him a more important character than actually shown in the film.

 

Will Disney ruin TCW? I don't know, and if it does, I won't cry over it (feed me to the Sarlacc!). I never was a big fan of the show. Will it be a shame? Most certainly, but if it happens, it happens. As a discerning viewer, I'll just ignore that the revival happened (just as I now choose to ignore everything outside the OT, no matter how much I may like some of the stuff), and will return to treating the show like it ended at season 6. (Fun fact: Every season has 23 episodes, except for s05 (20 episodes) and s06 (13 episodes). The new 'season' is supposed to have 12 episodes, so in truth, it will be a continuation of s06 rather than a new season of its own, although no one will call it that).

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